image Overcoming Tribulations in Bukky Agboola’s I Made It Through

By Timi Odueso


  • Title: I Made It Through
  • Author: Bukky Agboola
  • Publisher: Winepress Publishing
  • Number of pages: 148
  • Year of publication: 2016
  • Category: Memoir

‘We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not despairing; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed’. – 2 Corinthians 4:8–9, New American Standard Bible

Memoirs – political, religious or otherwise – tend to portray the lives of those they are based on as miraculous collections of occurrences that proselytise ways in which the reader supposedly can achieve the grace, faith, happiness and/or success of the author. This is understandable. However, I Made It Through is unlike such. More…

image A Portrait of Socio-Political and Religious Cynicism in Olukorede S Yishau’s In the Name of Our Father

By Nureni Ibrahim 


  • Title: In the Name of Our Father
  • Author: Olukorede S Yishau
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 228
  • Year of publication: 2018
  • Category: Fiction

In the Name of Our Father, Olurokede S Yishau’s debut novel, illuminates the multidimensional issue of religious and political cynicism in Nigerian society, using the story-within-a-story technique. The first strand follows the travails of the protagonist, Prophet Jeremiah – formerly known as Alani – who sacrifices his spiritual and religious beliefs on the altar of materialism. The second strand centres on the brutalisation of the society during the long years of military despotism, as seen through the eyes of a journalist, Julius Omoeko. More…

image English as a Tool in Relating the African Experience

By Ofuonyeadi Chukwudumebi Mercy


  • Title: My Africa, My City: An Afridiaspora Anthology
  • Editor: Nana-Ama Kyerematen
  • Publisher: Winepress Publishing
  • Number of pages: 155
  • Year of publication: 2016
  • Category: Essays, Fiction, Poetry

In his collection of essays, Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o writes, ‘Language carries culture, and culture carries, particularly through orature and literature, the entire body of values by which we come to perceive ourselves and our place in the world’. English, acquired from European colonisers, has become a tool in bridging linguistic barriers between Africans. Chinua Achebe said in his essay, ‘The African Writer and the English Language’, ‘I feel that the English language will be able to carry the weight of my African experiences. But it will have to be a new English, still in full communion with its ancestral home, but altered to suit its new African surroundings’. In this light, English as used in African literature is not just what was bequeathed to us but a new Creole capable of relating the African experience. More…

image The Craft of Happiness

By Veronica Elias Ugian 


  • Title: Life, Lessons… My Path to Happiness
  • Author: Abisola Biya
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 116
  • Year of publication: 2017
  • Category: Essays

Is happiness attainable? In Life, Lessons… My Path to Happiness, Abisola Biya answers in the affirmative and further says it is a choice. The book seeks to develop the mind of readers in order to enable them see things positively and strive for happiness regardless of the prevailing situation. The lessons Biya explores cover different experiences that people go through. She advocates that anyone can live a fulfilled life if only they cultivate the right mentality by approaching challenges through the prisms of self-love, self-value and the right disposition. More…

image The Land of the Upright Man: A Review of Jude Idada’s Sankara

By Timi Odueso


  • Title: Sankara
  • Author: Jude Idada
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 114
  • Year of publication: 2018
  • Category: Drama

‘There is no guarantee that those who have children would be remembered. What matters is that while you lived, you lived for something, and while you could, you helped to make a change’.

Although acted out daily, both on stage and in real life, drama can be seen as the least indulged of the literary forms. Unlike prose, it falls within stringent parameters, such as in its use of dialogue and characterisation. To captivate the reader, drama requires of the playwright not only skill but experience. Jude Idada’s Sankara earns its place alongside works by leading Nigerian playwrights like Femi Osofisan, Wole Soyinka and J P Clark, but it also raises the question of just how far fiction can be woven into the factional. More…

image When a King Dies

By Victor Udochi Iwueze-Elias


  • Title: Obito
  • Author: Sam Omatseye
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 100
  • Year of publication: 2018
  • Category: Drama

In his drama, Obito, Sam Omatseye recreates the past while commenting on the present and the corruption and hypocrisy in Nigeria through deftly applied satire. In the African sensibility, the cycle of life comprises three distinct planes: the dead, the living and the unborn, which together form the wheel around which life revolves. The play hinges on the death of a king and the lengths people within the corridors of power will go to distort the truth. The play examines the role of the media in erecting smokescreens of falsehood and the ways in which a sometimes unsuspecting populace is held captive. In such circumstances – as the late Dora Akunyili once observed, in the absence of concrete facts concerning the health of the then Nigerian president, Umaru Musa Yar’Adua – rumours are bound to take over. More…

image Against Liberalism and Idealism

By Ayodele Ibiyemi 


  • Title: Euphoria of Sophistry
  • Author: Terseer Sam Baki
  • Publisher: SEVHAGE Publishers
  • Number of pages: 62
  • Year of publication: 2015
  • Category: Poetry

Terseer Sam Baki’s collection extends the frontiers of poetry as it deals with several issues affecting human existence. It can be termed absolute poetry, going by the variety of themes treated. The collection is also deliberately designed to reflect this. More…

image Humans, Psychology and Sociology as a Circle of Mutual Influence

By Omotola Otubela 


  • Title: There Is a Lunatic in Every Town 
  • Author: Bash Amuneni
  • Publisher: SEVHAGE Publishers
  • Number of pages: 83
  • Year of publication: 2016
  • Category: Poetry

Ideas become irrelevant when they are not channelled or directed to the right people through an effective medium. African poets such as Wole Soyinka, John Pepper Clark and Tade Ipadeola have called attention to the relevance of African literature. A new voice joining the chorus of these legends is the performance poet and essayist, Bash Amuneni. His works include Freedom, a spoken word poetry album released in 2015, and There Is a Lunatic in Every Town, published in 2016. From a close study of these two works, one can observe that Amuneni is a poet that is greatly inspired by the society at large. More…

image We Need to Tell Our Stories: A Review of She Called Me Woman

By Ona Akinde 


  • Title: She Called Me Woman: Nigeria’s Queer Women Speak
  • Editors: Azeenarh Mohammed, Chitra Nagarajan and Rafeeat Aliyu
  • Publisher: Cassava Republic Press
  • Number of pages: 357
  • Year of publication: 2018
  • Category: Essays

There are many ways to describe silence: deafening, accepting, reassuring, uncomfortable, but one of its most outstanding, if negative, descriptions is that of a thief. Not just in the literal sense, but in the ways the culture of silence forces us to keep our stories and realities secret, in the ways it steals our existence from us. More…

image For God and Country

By Ekemini Pius 


  • Title: From the Crevices of Corps Hearts
  • Author: Chinyere Chukwudi-Okeh
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 148
  • Year of publication: 2017
  • Category: Fiction

There is nothing quite as refreshing as when a writer creates a new path for fiction to travel, nothing as scintillating as when a writer overcomes the temptation to follow conventional paths and instead has the courage to give fiction a new, sublime stretch of asphalt to ride on. In this exciting collection, Chinyere Chukwudi-Okeh weaves ten short stories around the National Youth Service, a mandatory one-year scheme for Nigerian graduates of tertiary institutions in Nigeria and abroad. What makes it a beautiful debut is her ability to lay bare the problems of Nigeria, yet hide them in the stories and experiences of corps members. More…