image I Am Not Ashamed of Tears

By Richard Oduor Oduku


  • Title: Let’s rain
  • Author: Fatiha Morchid
  • Publisher: Marsam
  • Number of pages: 86
  • Year of publication: 2014
  • Category: Poetry

Fatiha Morchid’s Let’s rain is a volume of meditative and aphoristic poems about ecstasy, longing, love and pain. Morchid is a poet, writer, and a paediatrician. She is the winner of the 2010 Moroccan Poetry Prize. The poems in Let’s rain were originally written in Arabic and have been translated into English by Norddine Zouitni. From the first poem, ‘Let’s rain’, to the last poem, ‘Things of essence’, the feeling is one of free-flow. With simplicity and directness, the poet ensures that the actuality of poetry is not lost in a mass of intellectual abstractions. The poems speak to the reader in a voice that is soft, elastic, and rubbery – an intoxication one struggles to break away from.

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image Of Transitions, Agendas and Bad Balls: Thoughts on Hamid Qabbal’s The Road to Mogador

By Su’eddie Vershima Agema


  • Title: The Road to Mogador
  • Author: Hamid Qabbal
  • Publisher: Editions Sefrioui, Essaouira, Morocco
  • Number of pages: 128
  • Year of publication: 2015
  • Category: Fiction

Hamid Qabbal has balls. In his third novel, The Road to Mogador, he disowns allegiance to his balls and paints men as monsters and women as angels trampled by these monsters. The novel is one of transition, new beginnings and gender relations. It belongs to the broad collection of works that form the corpus of Moroccan literature. More…

image Kintu: The Relevance of a Name and a Story

By Tọ́pẹ́ Salaudeen-Adégòkè


  • Title: Kintu
  • Author: Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi
  • Publisher: Kwani Trust
  • Number of pages: 442
  • Year of publication: 2014
  • Category: Fiction

 

– you know, there are the likes of Chinua Achebe, the pioneer editor of the African Writers Series, Wole Soyinka, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Nadine Gordimer, and a host of other giant writers who have fed the world with African stories. More…

image Roses for Betty and Other Stories: Ode to the Journey

By Tinuke Adeyi


  • Title: Roses for Betty and Other Stories
  • Editors: Emmanuel Sigauke and Sumayya Lee
  • Publisher: Centre for African Cultural Excellence (CACE)
  • Number of pages: 119
  • Year of publication: 2015
  • Category: Fiction

The writing of a short story demands a skill set that is unique and quite different from that required in writing a novel. A lot of the choices available to the novelist in the art of creation are simply off-limits to the short story writer, who has to contend with limitations of space in delivering their message, no matter how impassioned, important or controversial. More…

image In the Jungle of Exclusives: African Eyes and Other Solecisms of Seeing

By Tunji Olalere


  • Title: Through My African Eyes
  • Author: Jeff Koinange
  • Publisher: Footprint Press
  • Number of pages: 258
  • Year of publication: 2014
  • Category: Autobiography

‘I wanted to bring the African story to an American audience and let them decide, instead of blocking it and forgetting about us’.

Former CNN Africa Correspondent, Jeff Koinange, has taken to the page to give an account of the nearly five decades he has spent on earth in his autobiography, Through My African Eyes. More…

image Blood, Guts and Gore

By Agatha Aduro


  • Title: A Family Portrait: A Collection of Short Stories from the Breaking the Silence Project
  • Editors: Tsitsi Dangarembga et al
  • Publisher: ICAPA Publishing
  • Year of publication: 2014
  • Number of pages: 117
  • Category: Fiction

A Family Portrait is the ambitious product of a ten-day workshop, Breaking the Silence Project, which held in 2012 in Harare, organised by the Institute of Creative Arts for Progress in Africa (ICAPA) Trust and funded by the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation. There are seven fictional stories centred around the theme of violence in A Family Portrait. The stories are based on sixty true-life stories that were submitted to the workshop as letters from the public. More…

image Rhetoric of Pain and Other Resources

By Tomiwa Ilori


  • Title: A Nation in Labour
  • Author: Harriet Anena
  • Publisher: Millenium Press Ltd
  • Number of pages: 79
  • Year of publication: 2015
  • Category: Poetry

Pain sells. It is from it that the most beautiful expressions are fashioned to last in time and memory. There has been an attempt to explore the poetics of pain, anguish and feeling in a world where the economy is deception and its currency is ‘fakeness’. That attempt is Harriet Anena’s A Nation in Labour. A Nation in Labour is a four-part treatise that uses elevated language to tell of horror. Anena’s collection of poetry warns society about its warped value system through a disciplined use of satiric responses that resonate. Each part of the treatise soaks our dessicated humanity in fluid cadences. More…

image When Best Loved Tales for Africa Are Not Enough: A Review of Refilwe

By Adaudo Anyiam-Osigwe


  • Title: Refilwe
  • Author: Zukiswa Wanner
  • Illustrator: Tamsin Hinrichsen
  • Publisher: Jacana Media
  • Number of pages: 32
  • Year of publication: 2015
  • Category: Children

The African retelling of ‘best loved tales’, with a primary aim to encourage a love of reading in preschool and nursery school children, is commendable. Introducing children to the world of books and helping them develop a yearning for reading provides them with a platform to progressively experience the vast knowledge the world has to offer. However, there is a distinction to be made between the goal of such endeavours and the routes taken to achieve this aim. More…

image A Family Affair

By Modupe Yusuf


  • Title: After the Tears
  • Author: Michelle Faure
  • Publisher: Cover2Cover Books
  • Number of pages: 144
  • Year of publication: 2014
  • Category: Young Adult

Ideal love stories are ideal because they are a near-perfect imitation of what we dream love should be about. They have a happy ending, too. This love story, After the Tears, is however not that ideal. The recklessness of youth and the calculations of the not so young sometimes result in unforeseen and seemingly helpless situations. Such is the case with Busi whose life suffers a sharp reversal when she is made pregnant by her much older and married boyfriend. Having to care for her ageing grandmother while preparing for her final examinations and while dealing with the embarrassment of a swelling belly, she shies away from all social activities involving her schoolmates. Her otherwise simple life takes interesting turns within a really short time. More…

image In Praise of Death: An Existentialist Reading of Smithereens of Death

By Richard Oduor Oduku


  • Title: Smithereens of Death
  • Author: Olubunmi Familoni
  • Publisher: WriteHouse Collective, Ibadan, Nigeria
  • Number of pages: 124
  • Year of publication: 2015
  • Category: Fiction

‘Life is about death; tiny pieces of dying… but when the last piece has been peeled away, the grief that remains is an open sore on the hearts of those left behind – you cannot cover it with anything, with living … It will not heal tomorrow, or the day after …’ (‘A Rain of Many Things’, p 88)

 Life is inherently devoid of meaning. Like Jean-Paul Sartre would say, it is up to man to find meaning for himself. The inherent meaninglessness does not equal doom and depression. Rather, it opens up doors of possibilities and feeds the idea that we earn our freedom by finding ourselves and creating our own meanings. Existentialism lies at the heart of Smithereens of Death. In this collection of short stories, the characters create their own sense of purpose because of the failure of externalities – God and society – to provide one. More…