All posts by Munah Nicola Tarpeh

Nigerium: An Inevitable End

By Munah Nicola Tarpeh


  • Title: We Won’t Fade into Darkness
  • Author: T J Benson 
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 138
  • Year of publication: 2018
  • Category: Fiction

‘Gone are the days when people set up their own business for personal gain and profit, the business of a dying world is survival. Now we all work to save our nation from extinction’.

We Won’t Fade into Darkness is a dark, haunting collection of short stories about a post-apocalyptic Nigeria, where the air is impregnated with a poisonous gas called Nigerium that causes sperm cells to rot and kills people. It is a place so bleak, so disaster-struck that people are reduced to the most basic versions of themselves, with the instincts for self-preservation, sex, hunger, the desire to wander and death dictating the terms of existence. More…

The Leap from the African Bush to the City of Readers

By Munah Nicola Tarpeh


  • Title: Mr Hare Meets Mr Mandela
  • Author: Chris van Wyk
  • Illustrator: Paddy Bouma
  • Publisher: Jacana Media (Pty) Ltd
  • Number of pages: 30
  • Year of publication: 2016
  • Category: Children

‘Those who cannot read repeat their mistakes over and over…and so will you again’. – Mr Lion

Mr Hare Meets Mr Mandela by Chris van Wyk, a South African award-winning poet, short story writer and author of children’s books, deals with multiple themes like patriotism, bravery and the importance of being literate. These are complex themes that are presented in a very simple and humorous manner to teach children their importance.  More…

Above and Beyond

By Munah Nicola Tarpeh


  • Title: Wrecked
  • Author: Dumebi Ezar Ehigiator
  • Publisher: Winepress Publishing
  • Number of pages: 208
  • Year of publication: 2016
  • Category: Fiction

By remembering me you remember all those innocent victims. Moving forward and forgetting what happened is forgetting me. Then there will be no reason for me to live. I live to bear witness, to tell my testimony. Once I was wrecked, maybe I still am, but now I have hope. As for my son, if there is something that tortures me, it is the tomorrow of my son.

Wrecked is the story of five remarkable women who represent a large percentage of women in Nigeria, damaged by circumstances that were set in motion before they were born, circumstances that shape what they become, some with devastating effects. More…

The Story of Us

By Munah Nicola Tarpeh


  • Title: Son of Man 
  • Author: Amara Nicole Okolo
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 118
  • Year of publication: 2016
  • Category: Fiction

I am the story he wanted to publish. Each sentence simmered in bowls of wrath. The letters were fiery, their message scalding. I was eager to read, thirsty for attention. But as with every fateful story, I was rejected and put away because of my honesty, because I spoke the truth. And in 1996, nobody could handle my truth.

In this collection of six short stories, the author employs inanimate objects – a pair of worn shoes, a machete, a rosary, amongst others – to tell stories about human beings, the not-so-perfect world they live in and how it has affected them adversely. The stories have a common thread running through them: how the system has failed the citizens. More…

Ẹkúndayọ̀: From Sorrow to Joy

By Munah Nicola Tarpeh


  • Title: Thorns in My Boots 
  • Author: Awoleye Ayokunle Dominic
  • Publisher: Parrésia Publishers Ltd
  • Number of pages: 153
  • Year of publication: 2017
  • Category: Fiction

They say the rose flower also has thorns, but my life was just merely thorns, all the flowers were withered. They say it is he that wears the shoe that knows where it pinches; I decided not to wear just a shoe but boots. But my boots were full of thorns and it pinched me all over.

Thorns in My Boots is the short, gripping tale of a young man, Ojo, and his struggle for identity as he wrestles to restore his family’s dignity. The death of his father, a palmwine tapper and dipsomaniac, when he was only two years old leaves only him and his mother, a petty trader. He grows up with a strong sense of determination to complete anything he sets his mind to, hence his childhood moniker, ‘wa pa mi l’oni’, meaning you will have to kill me to stop me. More…